Bradley Wiggins faces a fight for his reputation in wake of Wada hack

Questions surround Tour de France winner and British Olympic champions employ of medical certifications for banned substances

Just last month Bradley Wiggins, the first British human to win the Tour de France, was basking in the glory of becoming the countrys most decorated Olympian at another glittering Games for Team GBs cyclists.

Now he faces a fight for his reputation as some of his hitherto most loyal advocates echo topics around his record on performance-enhancing medications arising from a Russian-led hacking endeavour into the World Anti-Doping Agency( Wada) database.

The questions surround the use of medical credentials to allow athletes to take otherwise banned substances for pre-existing conditions, and they are not particularly new. But the specificity and ferocity with which they are being asked in the wake of the Russian leak is new.

Wiggins has been forced to deny that the controversial Belgian doctor Geert Leinders was involved in his obtaining so-called therapeutic utilize exemptions( TUE ), after details of the TUEs granted to both him and fellow Tour de France winner, Chris Froome, were leaked late on Wednesday night. The leak detailed three TUEs obtained by Wiggins for the treatment of asthma and allergies between 2011 and 2013 each before his major target race for that season.

Wiggins has also had to clarify apparent incompatibilities between what he wrote in 2012 about the use of needles and the details that have emerged via the Fancy Bears hackers.

Leinders was a Team Sky physician between 2011 -2 012 Wiggins won the Tour de France in the latter year who was later banned for life for doping offences committed during a previous stint at the tainted Rabobank cycling team between 2001 -2 009.

Since the formation of Team Sky, originally envisioned as a professional road racing outgrowth of British Cyclings successful Olympic operation, the longstanding squad principal, Sir Dave Brailsford, has preached a loud anti-doping message.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *